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Paul Bright's Confessions of a Justified Sinner Reconstructed by Untitled Projects

Confessions of a Justified Sinner
Confessions of a Justified Sinner
Photo by Eoin Carey.

Please note, due to an issue with our online ticketing system we are unable to offer booking online. You can purchase tickets by calling our box office, 0845 330 3501 or booking in person at Tramway.
We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Scroll down for a trailer for the performance.

In 1987 Paul Bright, a radical young Scottish director, set out to stage James Hogg’s Confessions of Justified Sinner in a series of events in unusual locations across Scotland. Untitled Projects has been working with the actor George Anton to assemble an archive of these landmark productions. We've found amazing original film footage, and recreated some of our own. We've interviewed those involved in making the work and those who saw it. They’ve given us old photographs, some anecdotes and some secrets... In 2013, we share this material in an exhibition and live performance that celebrate the work of an unsung hero of Scottish theatre.  


George Anton has worked with some of the world’s most famous theatre directors, such as Declan Donnellan and Calixto Bieto. Now George reappraises the reputation of the unrecognised director Paul Bright. George looks back from a personal perspective, exploring the impact Paul Bright and his obsessive methodology had on the lives and relationships of the close knit group he collaborated with. He has discovered much he was unaware of about this innovative highpoint of an ultimately failed career in theatre: illusions lost, love lost, ambitions and dreams unfulfilled.

Overwhelmed by these memories Untitled Projects wonder at the lasting legacy of Paul Bright’s recklessly ambitious yet incomplete staging of Confessions of a Justified Sinner.

Untitled Projects has reconstructed Paul Bright’s Confessions of a Justified Sinner with the actor George Anton; writer Pamela Carter; cinematographer Christopher Doyle; director Stewart Laing; production manager Nick Millar; artists Robbie Thomson and Jack Wrigley; and researcher Emilia Weber.

A co-production with the National Theatre of Scotland and Tramway.

At it best, though – in the troubled heights of Anton’s performance, in its layers of narrative self-reflection, and in the show’s brilliantly-reconstructed collages of sound, film, visual images, and an entire archive exhibition – Laing and Carter’s work achieves a thrllling poetic intensity; and touches on something wild and self-destructive in Scotland, and in the human spirit,

Joyce McMillan, The Scotsman. 4 stars

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