Open For Everything

Dorkypark

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" . . an evening full of lust for life and music, a Roma revue that nonetheless refers to poverty and dearth of opportunity in powerful images and with a sense of self-irony"

Wiener Zeitung, May 2012

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Open for Everything is a travel through the stagnation of Roma communities in Europe to whom chances to work like any other citizen are rather low, where itinerant traditions have been replaced by sedentary life beside the uprootedness of the group of dancers who move around the world following working opportunities.


Since 2010 Macras has been researching the different ways of life, dance styles and music of the Roma in Hungary, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. In the course of this work she has brought together a large ensemble comprising Roma musicians and performers, amateurs of different ages, and dancers from her company DorkyPark to perform in her new show Open for Everything. It is with great aplomb that these very different people recount their lives and their dreams, their despair and their passions. This journey uses music and dance to lead us through the lives of the European Roma of today, seizing upon, playing with, and depicting with humour the prejudices, clichés, misunderstandings, similarities, traditions, discrimination, poverty and violence. Who is making use of whose prejudices? And just who are the true nomads of the 21st century?
 
A production by CONSTANZA MACRAS | DorkyPark and the GOETHE-INSTITUT. In co-production with Wiener Festwochen, New Stage of National Theatre Prague, Trafó House of Contemporary Arts Budapest, International Theatre Festival Divadelná Nitra, Hebbel am Ufer Berlin, Kampnagel Hamburg, HELLERAU – European Center for the Arts Dresden, Dansens Hus Stockholm and Zürcher Theater Spektakel.
Supported by the Capital Cultural Fund and the Governing Mayor of Berlin – Department for Cultural Affairs and the Open Society Foundations - with contribution of the Arts and Culture Program of Budapest.
 
The Tramway performances are supported by the GOETHE-INSTITUT Glasgow.